die

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Takođe pogledajte: dié, diè, diē, Diè, di'e, dîe, i Die

Engleski[uredi]

Izgovor[uredi]

Etimologija 1[uredi]

Od Srednji Engleski deyen, od Stari Engleski dīġan, dīeġan (to die) i Old Norse deyja (to die, pass away), oba od Pra-Germanski *dawjaną (to die) (compare Danski i Norwegian Bokmål , Norwegian Nynorsk døy, Low German döen, Srednji Holandski doyen, douwen, Old High German touwen), od Pra-Indo-Evropski *dʰew- (to pass away; to die) (compare Old Norse (catalepsy), Old Irish díth (end, death), Staroslovenski daviti (daviti, to strangle), Albanski vdes (to die), vdekje (death), Jermenski դի (di, corpse), Avestanski 𐬛𐬎𐬎𐬀𐬌𐬛𐬍(duuaidī, we press)).[1][2]. Displaced Old English sweltan and partially displaced Old English steorfan (whence Modern English starve).

Glagol[uredi]

die (third-person singular simple present dies, present participle dying, simple past and past participle died)

  1. (intransitive) To stop living; to become dead; to undergo death.
    1. followed by of; general use:
      • 1839, Charles Dickens, Oliver Twist, Penguin 1985, page 87:
        "What did she die of, Work'us?" said Noah. "Of a broken heart, some of our old nurses told me," replied Oliver.
      • 2000, Stephen King, On Writing, Pocket Books 2002, page 85:
        In 1971 or 72, Mom's sister Carolyn Weimer died of breast cancer.
    2. followed by from; general use, though somewhat more common in the context of medicine or the sciences:
      • 1865, British Medical Journal, 4 Mar 1865, page 213:
        She lived several weeks; but afterwards she died from epilepsy, to which malady she had been previously subject.
      • 2007, Frank Herbert & Kevin J. Anderson, Sandworms of Dune, Tor 2007, page 191:
        "Or all of them will die from the plague. Even if most of the candidates succumb. . ."
    3. followed by for; often expressing wider contextual motivations, though sometimes indicating direct causes:
      • 1961, Joseph Heller, Catch-22, Simon & Schuster 1999, page 232:
        Englishmen are dying for England, Americans are dying for America, Germans are dying for Germany, Russians are dying for Russia. There are now fifty or sixty countries fighting in this war.
      • 2003, Tara Herivel & Paul Wright (editors), Prison Nation, Routledge 2003, page 187:
        Less than three days later, Johnson lapsed into a coma in his jail cell and died for lack of insulin.
    4. (now rare) followed by with as an indication of direct cause:
      • 1600, William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing, Act III, Scene I:
        Therefore let Benedicke like covered fire, / Consume away in sighes, waste inwardly: / It were a better death, to die with mockes, / Which is as bad as die with tickling.
      • 1830, Joseph Smith, The Book of Mormon, Richards 1854, page 337:
        And there were some who died with fevers, which at some seasons of the year was very frequent in the land.
    5. (still current) followed by with as an indication of manner:
      She died with dignity.
  2. (transitive) To stop living and undergo (a specified death).
    He died a hero's death.
    They died a thousand deaths.
  3. (intransitive, figuratively) To yearn intensely.
    • 1598, Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing, Act III, Scene II:
      Yes, and his ill conditions; and in despite of all, dies for him.
    • 2004 Paul Joseph Draus, Consumed in the city: observing tuberculosis at century's end - Page 168
      I could see that he was dying, dying for a cigarette, dying for a fix maybe, dying for a little bit of freedom, but trapped in a hospital bed and a sick body.
  4. (intransitive) To be utterly cut off by family or friends, as if dead.
    The day our sister eloped, she died to our mother.
  5. (intransitive, figuratively) To become spiritually dead; to lose hope.
    He died a little inside each time she refused to speak to him.
  6. (intransitive, colloquial, hyperbolic) To be mortified or shocked by a situation.
    If anyone sees me wearing this ridiculous outfit, I'll die.
  7. (figuratively, intransitive, hyperbolic) To be so overcome with emotion or laughter as to be incapacitated.
    When I found out my two favorite musicians would be recording an album together, I literally planned my own funeral arrangements and died.
    • 1976, an anchorman on Channel Five in California, quoted in Journal and Newsletter [of the] California Classical Association, Northern Section:
      I literally died when I saw that.
  8. (intransitive, of a machine) To stop working, to break down.
    My car died in the middle of the freeway this morning.
  9. (intransitive, of a computer program) To abort, to terminate (as an error condition).
  10. To perish; to cease to exist; to become lost or extinct.
    • Spectator
      letting the secret die within his own breast
    • Tennyson
      Great deeds cannot die.
  11. To sink; to faint; to pine; to languish, with weakness, discouragement, love, etc.
    • Bible, 1 Samuel xxv. 37
      His heart died within, and he became as a stone.
  12. (often with "to") To become indifferent; to cease to be subject.
    to die to pleasure or to sin
  13. (intransitive, video games) To be killed by an enemy. Usually followed by to or another preposition.
    I can't believe I just died to a squirrel!
  14. (architecture) To disappear gradually in another surface, as where mouldings are lost in a sloped or curved face.
  15. To become vapid, flat, or spiritless, as liquor.
  16. (of a stand-up comedian or a joke) To fail to evoke laughter from the audience.
    Then there was that time I died onstage in Montreal...
Korisne beleške[uredi]
Sinonimi[uredi]
Izvedeni termini[uredi]
Povezani termini[uredi]
Prevodi[uredi]

Reference[uredi]

  1. J. P. Mallory, Douglas Q. Adams, Encyclopedia of Indo-European Culture (London: Fitzroy Dearborn, 1999), page 150, s.v. "death"
  2. Vladimir Orel, A Handbook of Germanic Etymology (Leiden, Netherlands: Brill, 2003).

Etimologija 2[uredi]

A pair of common dice with six sides each.
Various dice with different numbers of sides and distributions of values.

From Srednji Engleski dee, from Stari Francuski de (Modern Francuski ), from Latinski datum, from datus (given), the past participle of (to give), from Pra-Indo-Evropski *deh₃- (to lay out, to spread out).

Imenica[uredi]

die (plural dies)

  1. The cubical part of a pedestal, a plinth.
  2. A device for cutting into a specified shape.
  3. A device used to cut an external screw thread. (Internal screw threads are cut with a tap.)
  4. A mold for forming metal or plastic objects.
  5. An embossed device used in stamping coins and medals.
  6. (electronics) (plural also dice) An oblong chip fractured from a semiconductor wafer engineered to perform as an independent device or integrated circuit.
  7. Any small cubical or square body.
    • Watts
      words [] pasted upon little flat tablets or dies

Imenica[uredi]

die (plural dice)

  1. A regular polyhedron, usually a cube, with numbers or symbols on each side and used in games of chance.
    • 1748. David Hume. Enquiry concerning the human understanding. In: Wikisource. Wikimedia: 2007. § 46.
      If a die were marked with one figure or number of spots on four sides, and with another figure or number of spots on the two remaining sides, it would be more probable, that the former would turn up than the latter;
    • 2017 decembar 8, “Adorable Kitten”, in Unstable ((Molimo navedite jezik navoda)), Wizards of the Coast:Kategorja:Navodi sa nedostajućim parametrom za jezik
      When this creature enters the battlefield, roll a six-sided die. You gain life equal to the result.
  2. (obsolete) That which is, or might be, determined, by a throw of the die; hazard; chance.
    • Spenser
      Such is the die of war.
  3. (electronics) (plural also dies) An oblong chip fractured from a semiconductor wafer engineered to perform as an independent device or integrated circuit.
Usage notes[uredi]

The game of dice is singular. Thus in "Dice is a game played with dice," the first occurrence is singular, the second occurrence is plural. Otherwise, using the plural dice as a singular instead of die is considered incorrect by most authorities, but has come into widespread use.

Synonyms[uredi]
Derived terms[uredi]
Translations[uredi]

Etymology 3[uredi]

Variant spelling.

Noun[uredi]

die (plural dies)

  1. Obsolete spelling of dye
    • 1749, Henry Fielding, Tom Jones
      He hath carried his friendship to this man to a blameable length, by too long concealing facts of the blackest die.

Verb[uredi]

die

  1. Obsolete spelling of dye
    • 1739, John Cay, An abridgment of the publick statutes in force and use from Magna Charta, in the ninth year of King Henry III, to the eleventh year of his present Majesty King George II, inclusive, Drapery, XXVII. Sect. 16:
      Also no dyer shall die any cloth, except he die the cloth and the list with one colour, without tacking any bulrushes or such like thing upon the lists, upon pain to forfeit 40 s. for every cloth. And no person shall put to sale any cloth deceitfully dyed,
    • 1813, James Haigh, The Dier's Assistant in the Art of Dying Wool and Woollen Goods:
      To die wool with madder, prepare a fresh liquor, and when the water is come to a heat to bear the hand, put in half a pound of the finest grape madder for each pound of wool;
    • 1827, John Shepard, The artist & tradesman's guide: embracing some leading facts:
      To die Wool and Woollen Cloths of a Blue Colour. One part of indigo, in four parts concentrated sulphuric acid, dissolved; then add one part of dry carbonate of potash, [...]

Anagrams[uredi]


Afrikaans[uredi]

Etymology[uredi]

From Holandski die, which is used only as a demonstrative in Dutch. The replacement of the article de with stronger die is also common in Surinamese Dutch.

Pronunciation[uredi]

  • MFA(ključ): /di/
  • MFA(ključ): /‿i/ (article only; contracted form, particularly after prepositions and conjunctions)

Article[uredi]

die (definite)

  1. the (definite article)
    die manthe man
    die vrouthe woman
    die kindthe child

Pronoun[uredi]

die

  1. this one, these; that one, those; he, she, it, they
    Ek het dokter toe gegaan en die het gesê ek moet in bed bly.
    I went to the doctor and he / she said I had to stay in bed.

Usage notes[uredi]

  • The corresponding adjective form (“this”, “these”) is usually spelt dié in order to distinguish it from the definite article. This spelling is also sometimes used for the pronoun, though this is unnecessary.

Danish[uredi]

Pronunciation[uredi]

Etymology 1[uredi]

From Pra-Germanski [Term?], from Pra-Indo-Evropski *dʰeh₁(y)- (to suck, suckle). Cognate with Latinski fellō, Sanskrt धयति (dhayati, to suck). Compare causative dægge, Gotski 𐌳𐌰𐌳𐌳𐌾𐌰𐌽 (daddjan, suckle).

Noun[uredi]

die c

  1. breast milk, mother's milk, when sucked from the breast
Derived terms[uredi]

Etymology 2[uredi]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg Ovo entry nedostaje etimoloških informacija. Ako ste upoznati sa poreklom ovog izraza, dodajte ga na stranicu etymology instructions. Takođe možete da razgovarate o tome Etymology scriptorium.

Verb[uredi]

die (imperative di, infinitive at die, present tense dier, past tense diede, perfect tense har diet)

  1. suck (being nursed)

Dutch[uredi]

Etymology[uredi]

From Srednji Holandski die, a merger of Stari Holandski thie, thē, thia, thiu and similar forms of the demonstrative. As in Old High German ther, der it replaced the original masculine and feminine nominative forms from Pra-Germanski *sa.

Pronunciation[uredi]

Determiner[uredi]

Šablon:nl-det

  1. that (masculine, feminine); referring to a thing or a person further away.
    die boom
    that tree
    die vrouw
    that woman
  2. those (plural); referring to things or people further away.
    die vensters
    those windows

Inflection[uredi]

Šablon:nl-decl-demonstrative determiner

Pronoun[uredi]

die m, f, pl

  1. (relative) who, whom, which, that
    Ik ken geen mensen die dat kunnen.
    I don't know any people who can do that.
    Oh, maar ik ken iemand die dat wel kan!
    Oh, but I know somebody who can!

Usage notes[uredi]

A preceding comma may alter the meaning of a clause starting with a relative pronoun. Compare the following sentences:

  • Alle arbeiders die staken zullen op sancties moeten rekenen.
    All workers who are on strike should expect sanctions.
  • Alle arbeiders, die staken, zullen op sancties moeten rekenen.
    All workers, who are on strike, should expect sanctions.

In the first sentence, only the workers on strike are advised to expect sanctions. In the second sentence, the parenthetical phrase indicates that all the workers are on strike, and should all expect sanctions.


German[uredi]

Izgovor[uredi]

Član[uredi]

die (definite, feminine and plural form of der)

  1. the; declined form of der:
    1. nominative singular feminine
      die Frauthe woman
    2. accusative singular feminine
    3. nominative plural (all genders)
      die Männerthe men
    4. accusative plural (all genders)

Deklinacija[uredi]

Šablon:de-decl-definite article

Zamenica[uredi]

die (relative or demonstrative)

  1. (in a subordinate clause as a relative pronoun) that; which; who; whom; whose
    Ich kenne eine Frau, die das kann. — I know a woman who can do that.
  2. (as a demonstrative pronoun) this one; that one; these ones; those ones; she; her; it; they; them
    die dathat one (or she or they) there

Korisne beleške[uredi]

In a subordinate clause, die indicates a person or thing referenced in the main clause. It is used with plural or feminine singular antecedents.

Deklinacija[uredi]

Šablon:de-decl-relative pronoun

Anagrami[uredi]

Primeri:

Vikicitati

1 MOSE 1
Kapitel 1
24 Und Gott sprach: Die Erde bringe hervor lebendige Tiere, ein jegliches nach seiner Art: Vieh, Gewürm und Tiere auf Erden, ein jegliches nach seiner Art. Und es geschah also.
24. Potom15[1] reče17[2] Bog121[3]: Neka17[4] zemlja pusti iz sebe duše žive po vrstama njihovim, stoku i130[5] sitne životinje i131[5] zveri zemaljske po vrstama njihovim. I125[6] bi116[7] tako.{{{2}}}{{{3}}}[8]

[[{{{2}}}|Psal. 33:9]]

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1. Mojsijeva

Reference[uredi]

  1. POSTANjE 1 [1] u Đura Daničić, dr. Dimitrije Stefanović (2007) Biblija, -->, pages 813: “strana 1”→ISBN 1
  2. POSTANjE 1 [2] u Đura Daničić, dr. Dimitrije Stefanović (2007) Biblija, -->, pages 813: “strana 1”→ISBN 1
  3. POSTANjE 1 [3] u Đura Daničić, dr. Dimitrije Stefanović (2007) Biblija, -->, pages 813: “strana 1”→ISBN
  4. POSTANjE 1 [4] u Đura Daničić, dr. Dimitrije Stefanović (2007) Biblija, -->, pages 813: “strana 1”→ISBN 1
  5. 5,0 5,1 POSTANjE 1 [5] u Đura Daničić, dr. Dimitrije Stefanović (2007) Biblija, -->, pages 813: “strana 1”→ISBN
  6. POSTANjE 1 [6] u Đura Daničić, dr. Dimitrije Stefanović (2007) Biblija, -->, pages 813: “strana 1”→ISBN 1
  7. POSTANjE 1 [7] u Đura Daničić, dr. Dimitrije Stefanović (2007) Biblija, -->, pages 813: “strana 1”→ISBN 1
  8. POSTANjE 1 [8] u Đura Daničić, dr. Dimitrije Stefanović (2007) Biblija, -->, pages 813: “strana 1”→ISBN 1

Interlingua[uredi]

Noun[uredi]

die (plural dies)

  1. A day.

Derived terms[uredi]


Italijanski[uredi]

Etimologija[uredi]

From Latinski diēs, back-formed from the accusative diem (whose vowel was once long), from Proto-Italic *djēm, the accusative of *djous, from Pra-Indo-Evropski *dyew- (heaven, sky; to shine).

Pronunciation[uredi]

  • MFA(ključ): /ˈdi.e/, [ˈd̪iːe]
  • Hyphenation: dì‧e

Noun[uredi]

die m (invariable)

  1. Obsolete form of .

Latin[uredi]

Pronunciation[uredi]

Noun[uredi]

diē

  1. ablative jednine of diēs ("day").
    Sine die.
    Without a day.

Mandarin[uredi]

Romanization[uredi]

die

  1. Nonstandard spelling of diē.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of dié.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of diè.

Usage notes[uredi]

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Middle Dutch[uredi]

Etymology 1[uredi]

From Stari Holandski thie, thia, from Pra-Germanski *sa.

Pronunciation[uredi]

Article[uredi]

die

  1. the; definite article.
Inflection[uredi]

Ovaj article zahteva inflection-table template.

Descendants[uredi]

Determiner[uredi]

die

  1. that, those
  2. who, which, that
Inflection[uredi]

Ovaj determiner zahteva inflection-table template.

Descendants[uredi]
Further reading[uredi]
  • die (II)”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • die (I)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, 1929

Etymology 2[uredi]

From Stari Holandski thīo, from Pra-Germanski *þeuhą.

Noun[uredi]

dië f, n

  1. thigh
Descendants[uredi]
Further reading[uredi]
  • die (I)”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • die (IV)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, 1929

Mirandese[uredi]

Etymology[uredi]

From Latinski diēs.

Noun[uredi]

die m (plural dies)

  1. day

Antonyms[uredi]


Pennsylvania German[uredi]

Etymology[uredi]

Compare Nemački die.

Article[uredi]

die f (definite)

  1. the

Saterland Frisian[uredi]

Article[uredi]

die m

  1. the