quite

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Такође погледајте: quité

English[уреди]

Alternative forms[уреди]

Etymology 1[уреди]

A development of quit, influence by Anglo-Norman quite.

Pronunciation[уреди]

Adverb[уреди]

quite (not comparable)

  1. To the greatest extent or degree; completely, entirely.
    Синонимs: absolutely, fully, thoroughly, totally, utterly; see also Thesaurus:completely
    1. With verbs, especially past participles. [from 14th c.]
    2. With prepositional phrases and spatial adverbs. [from 15th c.]
      • 1891, Thomas Nelson Page, On Newfound River:
        Margaret passed quite through the pines, and reached the opening beyond which was what was once the yard, but was now, except for a strip of flower-border and turf which showed care, simply a tangle of bushes and briars.
      • 2010, Joanna Briscoe, The Guardian, 30 October:
        Religion and parochial etiquette are probed to reveal unhealthy, and sometimes shockingly violent, internal desires quite at odds with the surface life of a town in which tolerance is preached.
    3. With predicative adjectives. [from 15th c.]
    4. With attributive adjectives, following an (especially indefinite) article; chiefly as expressing contrast, difference etc. [from 16th c.]
      • 2003, Richard Dawkins, A Devil's Chaplain:
        When I warned him that his words might be offensive to identical twins, he said that identical twins were a quite different case.
      • 2011, Peter Preston, The Observer, 18 September:
        Create a new, quite separate, private company – say Murdoch Newspaper Holdings – and give it all, or most of, the papers that News Corp owns.
    5. Preceding nouns introduced by the indefinite article. Chiefly in negative constructions. [from 16th c.]
    6. With adverbs of manner. [from 17th c.]
      • 2009, John F. Schmutz, The Battle of the Crater: A complete history:
        However, the proceedings were quite carefully orchestrated to produce what seemed to be a predetermined outcome.
      • 2011, Bob Burgess, The Guardian, 18 October:
        Higher education institutions in the UK are, quite rightly, largely autonomous.
  2. In a fully justified sense; truly, perfectly, actually.
    1. Coming before the indefinite article and an attributive adjective. (Now largely merged with moderative senses, below.) [from 17th c.]
      • 1898, Charles Gavrice, Nell of Shorne Mills:
        "My little plot has been rather successful, after all, hasn't it?" "Quite a perfect success," said Drake.
      • 2001, Paul Brown, The Guardian, 7 February:
        While the government claims to lead the world with its plans to reduce carbon dioxide emissions, the figures tell quite a different story.
    2. With plain adjectives, past participles, and adverbs. [from 18th c.]
      • Шаблон:RQ:Ferguson Zollenstein
      • 2010, Dave Hill, The Guardian, 5 November:
        London Underground is quite unique in how many front line staff it has, as anyone who has travelled on the Paris Metro or New York Subway will testify.
    3. Coming before the definite article and an attributive superlative. [from 18th c.]
      • Шаблон:RQ:Saki Reginald in Russia
      • 1923, "The New Pictures", Time, 8 October:
        Scaramouche has already been greeted as the finest French Revolution yet brought to the screen-and even if you are a little weary of seeing a strongly American band of sans-culottes demolish a pasteboard Paris, you should not miss Scaramouche, for it is quite the best thing Rex Ingram has done since The Four Horsemen.
    4. Before a noun preceded by an indefinite article; now often with ironic implications that the noun in question is particularly noteworthy or remarkable. [from 18th c.]
      • 1830, Senate debate, 15 April:
        To debauch the Indians with rum and cheat them of their land was quite a Government affair, and not at all criminal; but to use rum to cheat them of their peltry, was an abomination in the sight of the law.
      • 2011, Gilbert Morris, The Crossing:
        “Looks like you and Clay had quite a party,” she said with a glimmer in her dark blue eyes.
    5. Before a noun preceded by the definite article. [from 18th c.]
      • Шаблон:RQ:Trollope Eustace Diamonds
      • 2006, Sherman Alexie, "When the story stolen is your own", Time, 6 February:
        His memoir features a child named Tommy Nothing Fancy who suffers from and dies of a seizure disorder. Quite the coincidence, don't you think?
    6. (now rare) With prepositional or adverbial phrases. [from 18th c.]
  3. (especially Britain) To a moderate extent or degree; somewhat, rather. [from 19th c.]
    Lua грешка in Модул:usex at line 124: attempt to index local 'lang' (a nil value).
    Синонимs: see Thesaurus:moderately
Usage notes[уреди]
  • This is a non-descriptive qualifier, similar to fairly and rather and somewhat. Used where a plain adjective needs to be modified, but cannot be qualified. When spoken, the meaning can vary with the tone of voice and stress. He was quite big can mean anything from "not exactly small" to "almost huge".
Derived terms[уреди]
Descendants[уреди]
  • Jersey Dutch: kwāit
Translations[уреди]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Interjection[уреди]

quite

  1. (chiefly UK) Indicates agreement; exactly so.
    Lua грешка in Модул:usex at line 124: attempt to index local 'lang' (a nil value).

Etymology 2[уреди]

From Шпански quite.

Pronunciation[уреди]

Noun[уреди]

quite (plural quites)

  1. (bullfighting) A series of passes made with the cape to distract the bull.

Anagrams[уреди]


Galician[уреди]

Verb[уреди]

quite

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of quitar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of quitar

Latin[уреди]

Verb[уреди]

quīte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of queō

Old French[уреди]

Adjective[уреди]

quite m (oblique and nominative feminine singular quite)

  1. Alternative form of quitte

Portuguese[уреди]

Etymology[уреди]

From Old Portuguese quite, from Стари Француски quitte (free; liberated), from Латински quiētus.

Pronunciation[уреди]

Шаблон:pt-IPA

  • Hyphenation: qui‧te

Adjective[уреди]

quite

  1. quit (released from obligation)
  2. settled
  3. divorced

Derived terms[уреди]

Verb[уреди]

quite

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of quitar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of quitar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of quitar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of quitar

Spanish[уреди]

Noun[уреди]

quite m (plural quites)

  1. the action of removal
  2. a swerve or sidestep

Derived terms[уреди]

Verb[уреди]

quite

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of quitar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of quitar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of quitar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of quitar.

Further reading[уреди]