dark

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Такође погледајте: Dark

English[уреди]

Pronunciation[уреди]

Etymology 1[уреди]

From Средњи Енглески derk, from Стари Енглески deorc (dark, obscure, gloomy, without light, dreadful, horrible, sad, cheerless, sinister, wicked), from Пра-Германски *derkaz (dark), from Пра-Индо-Европски *dʰerg- (dim, dull), from Пра-Индо-Европски *dʰer- (dull, dirty).

Adjective[уреди]

A fairly dark (lacking light) railroad station, with a very dark (lacking light) tunnel beyond
A woman with dark hair and skin.

dark (comparative darker, superlative darkest)

  1. Having an absolute or (more often) relative lack of light.
    The room was too dark for reading.
    • 1879, R[ichard] J[efferies], chapter 1, in The Amateur Poacher, London: Smith, Elder, & Co., [], OCLC 752825175:
      They burned the old gun that used to stand in the dark corner up in the garret, close to the stuffed fox that always grinned so fiercely. Perhaps the reason why he seemed in such a ghastly rage was that he did not come by his death fairly. And why else was he put away up there out of sight?—and so magnificent a brush as he had too.
    • 2013 јул 20, “Out of the gloom”, in The Economist, volume 408, number 8845:
      [Rural solar plant] schemes are of little help to industry or other heavy users of electricity. Nor is solar power yet as cheap as the grid. For all that, the rapid arrival of electric light to Indian villages is long overdue. When the national grid suffers its next huge outage, as it did in July 2012 when hundreds of millions were left in the dark, look for specks of light in the villages.
    1. (of a source of light) Extinguished.
      Dark signals should be treated as all-way stop signs.
    2. Deprived of sight; blind.
      • (Can we date this quote by John Evelyn and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
        He was, I think, at this time quite dark, and so had been for some years.
  2. (of colour) Dull or deeper in hue; not bright or light.
    my sister's hair is darker than mine;  her skin grew dark with a suntan
    • 1915, Emerson Hough, The Purchase Price, chapterI:
      Serene, smiling, enigmatic, she faced him with no fear whatever showing in her dark eyes. The clear light of the bright autumn morning had no terrors for youth and health like hers.
    • 1977, Agatha Christie, chapter 2, in An Autobiography, part II, London: Collins, →ISBN:
      If I close my eyes I can see Marie today as I saw her then. Round, rosy face, snub nose, dark hair piled up in a chignon.
  3. Hidden, secret, obscure.
    1. Not clear to the understanding; not easily through; obscure; mysterious; hidden.
      • (Can we date this quote by William Shakespeare and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
        What's your dark meaning, mouse, of this light word?
      • 1594-, Richard Hooker, Of the Lawes of Ecclesiastical Politie
        What may seem dark at the first, will afterward be found more plain.
      • 1801, Isaac Watts, The improvement of the mind, or A supplement to the art of logic
        It is the remark of an ingenious writer, should a barbarous Indian, who had never seen a palace or a ship, view their separate and disjointed parts, and observe the pillars, doors, windows, cornices and turrets of the one, or the prow and stern, the ribs and masts, the ropes and shrouds, the sails and tackle of the other, he would be able to form but a very lame and dark idea of either of those excellent and useful inventions.
      • (Can we date this quote by John Campbell Shairp and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
        the dark problems of existence
    2. (gambling, of race horses) Having racing capability not widely known.
  4. Without moral or spiritual light; sinister, malign.
    a dark villain;  a dark deed
    • (Can we date this quote by John Milton and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      Left him at large to his own dark designs.
  5. Conducive to hopelessness; depressing or bleak.
    the Great Depression was a dark time;  the film was a dark psychological thriller
    • (Can we date this quote by Thomas Babington Macaulay, 1st Baron Macaulay and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      A deep melancholy took possession of him, and gave a dark tinge to all his views of human nature.
    • (Can we date this quote by Washington Irving and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      There is, in every true woman's heart, a spark of heavenly fire, which beams and blazes in the dark hour of adversity.
  6. Lacking progress in science or the arts; said of a time period.
    • (Can we date this quote by Sir John Denham (poet) and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      The age wherein he lived was dark, but he / Could not want light who taught the world to see.
    • (Can we date this quote by Arthur Hallam and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      The tenth century used to be reckoned by mediaeval historians as the darkest part of this intellectual night.
  7. With emphasis placed on the unpleasant aspects of life; said of a work of fiction, a work of nonfiction presented in narrative form or a portion of either.
    The ending of this book is rather dark.
Synonyms[уреди]
Antonyms[уреди]
Derived terms[уреди]
Related terms[уреди]
Translations[уреди]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Etymology 2[уреди]

From Средњи Енглески derk, derke, dirke, dyrke, from the adjective (see above), or possibly from an unrecorded Стари Енглески *dierce, *diercu (dark, darkness).

Noun[уреди]

dark (usually uncountable, plural darks)

  1. A complete or (more often) partial absence of light.
    • (Can we date this quote by Shakespeare and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      Here stood he in the dark, his sharp sword out.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 17, in The China Governess[1]:
      The face which emerged was not reassuring. It was blunt and grey, the nose springing thick and flat from high on the frontal bone of the forehead, whilst his eyes were narrow slits of dark in a tight bandage of tissue. […].
    • 2013 јул 20, “Out of the gloom”, in The Economist, volume 408, number 8845:
      [Rural solar plant] schemes are of little help to industry or other heavy users of electricity. Nor is solar power yet as cheap as the grid. For all that, the rapid arrival of electric light to Indian villages is long overdue. When the national grid suffers its next huge outage, as it did in July 2012 when hundreds of millions were left in the dark, look for specks of light in the villages.
    Dark surrounds us completely.
  2. (uncountable) Ignorance.
    We kept him in the dark.
    The lawyer was left in the dark as to why the jury was dismissed.
    • (Can we date this quote by Shakespeare and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      Look, what you do, you do it still i' th' dark.
    • (Can we date this quote by John Locke and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      Till we perceive by our own understandings, we are as much in the dark, and as void of knowledge, as before.
  3. (uncountable) Nightfall.
    It was after dark before we got to playing baseball.
  4. A dark shade or dark passage in a painting, engraving, etc.
    • (Can we date this quote by Dryden and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      The lights may serve for a repose to the darks, and the darks to the lights.
Translations[уреди]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.
Derived terms[уреди]

Etymology 3[уреди]

From Средњи Енглески derken, from Стари Енглески deorcian, from Пра-Германски *derkōną.

Verb[уреди]

dark (third-person singular simple present darks, present participle darking, simple past and past participle darked)

  1. (intransitive) To grow or become dark, darken.
  2. (intransitive) To remain in the dark, lurk, lie hidden or concealed.
  3. (transitive) To make dark, darken; to obscure.

See also[уреди]

Anagrams[уреди]


Italian[уреди]

Etymology[уреди]

Енглески

Adjective[уреди]

dark (invariable)

  1. dark (used especially to describe a form of punk music)