dark

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Такође погледајте: Dark

English language.svg Енглески

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Средњи Енглески derk, from Стари Енглески deorc, from Proto-West Germanic *derk (dark), from Пра-Индо-Европски *dʰerg- (dim, dull), from Пра-Индо-Европски *dʰer- (dull, dirty).

Adjective

A fairly dark (lacking light) railroad station, with a very dark (lacking light) tunnel beyond
A woman with dark hair and skin.

dark (comparative darker, superlative darkest)

  1. Having an absolute or (more often) relative lack of light.
    The room was too dark for reading.
    • 1879, R[ichard] J[efferies], chapter 1, in The Amateur Poacher, London: Smith, Elder, & Co., [], OCLC 752825175:
      They burned the old gun that used to stand in the dark corner up in the garret, close to the stuffed fox that always grinned so fiercely. Perhaps the reason why he seemed in such a ghastly rage was that he did not come by his death fairly. And why else was he put away up there out of sight?—and so magnificent a brush as he had too.
    • 2013 јул 20, “Out of the gloom”, in The Economist, volume 408, number 8845:
      [Rural solar plant] schemes are of little help to industry or other heavy users of electricity. Nor is solar power yet as cheap as the grid. For all that, the rapid arrival of electric light to Indian villages is long overdue. When the national grid suffers its next huge outage, as it did in July 2012 when hundreds of millions were left in the dark, look for specks of light in the villages.
    1. (of a source of light) Extinguished.
      Dark signals should be treated as all-way stop signs.
    2. Deprived of sight; blind.
      • 29 March 1661 (entry), 1818 (first published), John Evelyn, Diary
        He was, I think, at this time quite dark, and so had been for some years.
  2. Transmitting, reflecting, or receiving inadequate light to render timely discernment or comprehension: caliginous, darkling, dim, gloomy, lightless, sombre.
  3. (of colour) Dull or deeper in hue; not bright or light.
    my sister's hair is darker than mine;  her skin grew dark with a suntan
  4. Ambiguously or unclearly expressed: enigmatic, esoteric, mysterious, obscure, undefined.
    • Шаблон:RQ:Shakespeare Love's Labour's Lost
    • 1594–, Richard Hooker, Of the Lawes of Ecclesiastical Politie
      What may seem dark at the first, will afterward be found more plain.
    • 1801, Isaac Watts, The improvement of the mind, or A supplement to the art of logic
      It is the remark of an ingenious writer, should a barbarous Indian, who had never seen a palace or a ship, view their separate and disjointed parts, and observe the pillars, doors, windows, cornices and turrets of the one, or the prow and stern, the ribs and masts, the ropes and shrouds, the sails and tackle of the other, he would be able to form but a very lame and dark idea of either of those excellent and useful inventions.
    • 1881, John Shairp, Aspects of Poetry
      the dark problems of existence
  5. Marked by or conducted with secrecy: hidden, secret; clandestine, surreptitious.
    (betting, of race horses) Having racing capability not widely known.
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  6. Without moral or spiritual light; sinister, malign.
    a dark villain;  a dark deed
  7. Conducive to hopelessness; depressing or bleak.
    the Great Depression was a dark time;  the film was a dark psychological thriller
  8. (of a time period) Lacking progress in science or the arts.
    • 1668, Sir John Denham, The Progress of Learning
      The age wherein he lived was dark, but he
      Could not want light who taught the world to see.
    • 1837, Henry Hallam, Introduction to the Literature of Europe, in the Fifteenth, Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries
      The tenth century used to be reckoned by mediaeval historians as the darkest part of this intellectual night.
  9. Extremely sad, depressing, or somber, typically due to, or marked by, a tragic or undesirable event.
    September 11, 2001, the day when four terrorist attacks destroyed the Twin Towers and the Pentagon, is often referred to as America's dark day.
    • 2014 април 1, “Marathon Mementos Remind of Boston's Dark Day”, in NBC News[1]:
  10. With emphasis placed on the unpleasant aspects of life; said of a work of fiction, a work of nonfiction presented in narrative form, or a portion of either.
    The ending of this book is rather dark.
  11. (broadcasting, of a television station) Off the air; not transmitting.
Synonyms
Antonyms
Derived terms
Related terms
Translations
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Etymology 2

From Средњи Енглески derk, derke, dirke, dyrke, from the adjective (see above), or possibly from an unrecorded Стари Енглески *dierce, *diercu (dark, darkness).

Noun

dark (usually uncountable, plural darks)

  1. A complete or (more often) partial absence of light.
    • Шаблон:RQ:Shakespeare King Lear
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 17, in The China Governess[2]:
      The face which emerged was not reassuring. It was blunt and grey, the nose springing thick and flat from high on the frontal bone of the forehead, whilst his eyes were narrow slits of dark in a tight bandage of tissue. […].
    • 2013 јул 20, “Out of the gloom”, in The Economist, volume 408, number 8845:
      [Rural solar plant] schemes are of little help to industry or other heavy users of electricity. Nor is solar power yet as cheap as the grid. For all that, the rapid arrival of electric light to Indian villages is long overdue. When the national grid suffers its next huge outage, as it did in July 2012 when hundreds of millions were left in the dark, look for specks of light in the villages.
    Dark surrounds us completely.
  2. (uncountable) Ignorance.
    We kept him in the dark.
    The lawyer was left in the dark as to why the jury was dismissed.
  3. (uncountable) Nightfall.
    It was after dark before we got to playing baseball.
  4. A dark shade or dark passage in a painting, engraving, etc.
Synonyms
Derived terms
Translations
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Etymology 3

From Средњи Енглески derken, from Стари Енглески deorcian, from Proto-West Germanic *derkōn.

Verb

dark (third-person singular simple present darks, present participle darking, simple past and past participle darked)

  1. (intransitive) To grow or become dark, darken.
  2. (intransitive) To remain in the dark, lurk, lie hidden or concealed.
  3. (transitive) To make dark, darken; to obscure.

See also

Anagrams


Italian language.svg Италијански

Etymology

Енглески

Pronunciation

Adjective

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  1. dark (used especially to describe a form of punk music)

References